Amy Abe
Instructor & Curriculum Developer, Norquest College

Amy is innovative, unfailingly described as an out-of-the-box thinker: “Her work is grounded in theory and research… The courses that she produces are effective pedagogically, and meaningful to students… [We] find her work inspiring for the reason that it goes beyond more traditional approaches to language education and challenges us to become better.” Amy recently developed an award-nominated suite of courses addressing the critical gaps preventing students from achieving post-secondary success and was runner up for NorQuest’s highest teaching award. As associate chair, Amy coordinated PD opportunities and oversaw production of assessment tools and instructional materials. Amy doesn’t believe in[...]

Amy is innovative, unfailingly described as an out-of-the-box thinker: “Her work is grounded in theory and research… The courses that she produces are effective pedagogically, and meaningful to students… [We] find her work inspiring for the reason that it goes beyond more traditional approaches to language education and challenges us to become better.” Amy recently developed an award-nominated suite of courses addressing the critical gaps preventing students from achieving post-secondary success and was runner up for NorQuest’s highest teaching award. As associate chair, Amy coordinated PD opportunities and oversaw production of assessment tools and instructional materials. Amy doesn’t believe in developing a silo of expertise but draws from a growing body of knowledge and interests to keep up with changes in the educational landscape. Amy’s ‘no fences’ approach means integrating novel approaches to curriculum, classroom, and policy. She serves as a model for how to engage students in the learning process; her students emphasize the depth of trust they have in her. Amy views the learning community as a place to respect “differences and [recognize] that…differences may lead to [learners] making choices that we would not make… When we hold space, we release control and we honour differences.” (Plett, 2015)

Valerie Lopes
Teaching and Learning, Seneca College

Valerie is passionate about enabling individuals to be informed, responsible and engaged citizens in their communities, in Canadian society and in a complex, global and increasingly digital world. Grounded in her philosophy that learning is about making connections and building networks, she constantly asks herself: How am I inspiring learning? How do I know?

As noted in the letters of support: “Her work is characterized by her ability to inspire and energize others” -“Valerie’s enthusiasm and generosity within the Seneca community continually makes a positive impact” – “She worked tirelessly to renew and teach in our Faculty Development Program, develop[...]

Valerie is passionate about enabling individuals to be informed, responsible and engaged citizens in their communities, in Canadian society and in a complex, global and increasingly digital world. Grounded in her philosophy that learning is about making connections and building networks, she constantly asks herself: How am I inspiring learning? How do I know?

As noted in the letters of support: “Her work is characterized by her ability to inspire and energize others” -“Valerie’s enthusiasm and generosity within the Seneca community continually makes a positive impact” – “She worked tirelessly to renew and teach in our Faculty Development Program, develop workshops and other resources for faculty” – “Her ability to connect with her students and to teach difficult concepts are truly superior”.

Valerie’s award-winning research focuses on the use of digital, mobile and social technology tools to engage individuals in the content and context of their learning experiences. She has co-authored a number of publications and is an engaging presenter who willingly shares her experience and expertise.

Guided by her belief that “we must be the change we wish to see”, Valerie is a strong advocate for re-designing the construct of higher education. Follow her on Twitter @valerielopes

Julie Mooney
Dawson Centre for Peace Education, Dawson College

Julie’s philosophy of peer leadership gives homage to the dance of relational learning (socio-constructivism) and multiple ways of knowing (literacies). She believes in leadership that supports continuous professional learning, intrapreneurship, and the development of the whole person.

An inquisitive, caring, and inventive educator, Julie draws on her professional connections and experience in college and university teaching, curriculum development at peacekeeping training centres in West and Central Africa, educational development through a centre for teaching and learning, research ethics leadership, and leading the establishment of a centre for peace education, to cultivate and sustain her reflexive practice and to inform her[...]

Julie’s philosophy of peer leadership gives homage to the dance of relational learning (socio-constructivism) and multiple ways of knowing (literacies). She believes in leadership that supports continuous professional learning, intrapreneurship, and the development of the whole person.

An inquisitive, caring, and inventive educator, Julie draws on her professional connections and experience in college and university teaching, curriculum development at peacekeeping training centres in West and Central Africa, educational development through a centre for teaching and learning, research ethics leadership, and leading the establishment of a centre for peace education, to cultivate and sustain her reflexive practice and to inform her research. Julie is interested in how learning communities can serve as an organizational framework for feeding innovation, as well as a site for professional development.

She is described by superiors as, “a generous peer leader who […] encourages her colleagues to think creatively, pursue their professional interests, and continually develop their capacities as educators, and mentors in their own right.” In support of her candidacy for the CSEC award, colleagues shared that Julie “helps to establish safe environments for co-learning;” she “demystifies unfamiliar approaches and content, asking insightful questions and sharing her own learning path.” “Julie is a motivational force, who through her words and substantial actions has inspired teachers and students.”

Julie is the Quebec Representative for the College Sector Educators Community of the STLHE and member of the Writing Retreats Working Group for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) Canada.

Steve Musson
Recreation Studies Department, Langara College

Steve has a distinctly teleological approach to teaching. He continually asks himself reflective questions like: “What is the purpose (the ultimate goals) of my teaching endeavours?” and “Are my choices and actions moving me toward my goals as a teacher?” These may sound like abstract questions, but in reality they have a huge impact on a teacher’s daily behaviours and on a teacher’s long-term impact on students.

Steve is committed to constantly and sustainably improving as an Instructor. He does this through the process of ‘deliberate practice’. Good teaching is not just a matter of working hard, nor is it[...]

Steve has a distinctly teleological approach to teaching. He continually asks himself reflective questions like: “What is the purpose (the ultimate goals) of my teaching endeavours?” and “Are my choices and actions moving me toward my goals as a teacher?” These may sound like abstract questions, but in reality they have a huge impact on a teacher’s daily behaviours and on a teacher’s long-term impact on students.

Steve is committed to constantly and sustainably improving as an Instructor. He does this through the process of ‘deliberate practice’. Good teaching is not just a matter of working hard, nor is it a matter of natural talent. It is primarily a matter of mindfully working on what you are not good at. This means that sometimes good teachers don’t look like ‘experts’ because they are constantly experimenting, learning new things, and sometimes picking up the pieces of an idea a bit ahead of its time.

Steve also believes that good teaching is a collective enterprise. Good teachers need other good teachers in order to flourish. There are some kinds of teaching and learning that can only be accomplished when several instructors evolve from a group of co-workers into a collective of colleagues.

Chris Whittaker
Physics Faculty & Science Program Coordinator, Dawson College

As a leader, Chris’ colleagues point to his ongoing efforts to improve student learning, his commitment to advancing the field of physics education through research and innovation, his mentoring of peers, and of course his Active Learning Classrooms. As a teacher, Chris focuses on creating effective learning activities that keep the individual student in mind while leveraging the benefits of collaborative engagement. He leaves room for his students to have fun and see the beauty in learning physics, and his students say that by sharing his many personal experiences he makes his teaching meaningful to them while also making him[...]

As a leader, Chris’ colleagues point to his ongoing efforts to improve student learning, his commitment to advancing the field of physics education through research and innovation, his mentoring of peers, and of course his Active Learning Classrooms. As a teacher, Chris focuses on creating effective learning activities that keep the individual student in mind while leveraging the benefits of collaborative engagement. He leaves room for his students to have fun and see the beauty in learning physics, and his students say that by sharing his many personal experiences he makes his teaching meaningful to them while also making him more approachable.

STLHE is Proudly Partnered With:
info

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best user experience on our website. By using this website, you consent to this site’s use of these cookies. For more information, visit our Privacy Policy page.